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@square

Small businesses are perfect.

88.9k Followers | 1.9k Following | 938 Medias

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Square is following 1971 and followed by 88984 users on Instagram. Square shared 938 media since joining Instagram.

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“In my neighborhood, when you’re born with this skin color it wasn’t easy to get the opportunities like a white person would.” ⠀ This is Scarr Pimentel, owner of Scarr’s Pizza (@scarrspizza), a slice shop on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. ⠀ “I remember in 4th…
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“In my neighborhood, when you’re born with this skin color it wasn’t easy to get the opportunities like a white person would.” ⠀ This is Scarr Pimentel, owner of Scarr’s Pizza (@scarrspizza) a slice shop on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. ⠀ “I remember in 4th grade, a guy would volunteer and come in once a month to teach us about business. His name was George, and he would teach us about supply and demand and I just fell in love with it. I was like ‘all right, this is what I want to do. I want to own a business.’” ⠀ @bonappetitmag recently named Scarr’s the best slice in NYC. Click the link in our bio to watch the first episode of “How I Made This” featuring Scarr’s Pizza.

We partnered with Maya Ealey (@mayaealey), a designer and illustrator based in Oakland, CA, and asked her to show us how she sees Square Stand. She currently spends the day on @asana’s brand design team and the night traveling to the past with her side project,…
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We partnered with Maya Ealey (@mayaealey) a designer and illustrator based in Oakland, CA, and asked her to show us how she sees Square Stand. She currently spends the day on @asanarsquos brand design team and the night traveling to the past with her side project, @justrewindit

“Black History Month is a celebration of the contributions and accomplishments of black people to this country. We need to gain a greater understanding and appreciation for the traditions rooted in that rich history.” —Lauren Stovall, marketing director,…
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“Black History Month is a celebration of the contributions and accomplishments of black people to this country. We need to gain a greater understanding and appreciation for the traditions rooted in that rich history.” —Lauren Stovall, marketing director, @hotsamsdetroit ⠀ Hot Sam’s, the oldest clothing store in Downtown Detroit, recently celebrated its 99th anniversary. Lauren’s father, Tony, has been the CEO of Hot Sam’s since he took over as owner in 1994. Before that, he was the shop’s top salesman, and has been part of the Hot Sam’s family since 1974. ⠀ “It’s challenging to sustain a business in an ever-changing economy,” said Lauren. “We have already survived a depression and a recession, and we are thriving today. We can thank the city of Detroit for that.” ⠀ The store has a rich history spanning multiple generations, giving the brand a unique identity in the competitive and ever-changing city of Detroit. Hot Sam’s has served its community with quality clothing for nearly 100 years, dressing every Detroit mayor since 1921 and recording artists like Marvin Gaye, The Temptations, and The Four Tops. Lauren’s job is to keep growing the business, and she says the future is bright. ⠀ “Our brand tells the story of who we are and why we are here. It stretches beyond the clothing and the doors of the store, reaching into the homes in our community. Hot Sam's is an indigenous business of Detroit. We are stewards of the community, we are leaders of the community, and we are part of the history and legacy of our community.” ⠀ Visit @hotsamsdetroit at 127 Monroe Ave. in Downtown Detroit.

Founded in 2015 by Carla Williams, Material Life is a retail concept shop dedicated to gathering, promoting, archiving, and making accessible the complexity of black life and history through photography, fashion, books, fine art, artists edition, and vintage…
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Founded in 2015 by Carla Williams, Material Life is a retail concept shop dedicated to gathering, promoting, archiving, and making accessible the complexity of black life and history through photography, fashion, books, fine art, artists' edition, and vintage collectibles, with a particular emphasis on African American history. ⠀ An artist all her life, Carla’s love for the community in which she lives and serves is at the forefront of what drives her. ⠀ “I wanted to start a retail shop that supported local art here in New Orleans,” said Carla. “We have the absolute best people, so there was no plan B. Having a plan B means you’re setting yourself up to fail.”

“Black women inspire me. Statistically, we have so few resources in this country and also statistically do the most with them.” —Carla Williams, owner of Material Life (@materiallife) in New Orleans, LA ⠀ These entrepreneurs make up a collective at the Contemporary…
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“Black women inspire me. Statistically, we have so few resources in this country and also statistically do the most with them.” —Carla Williams, owner of Material Life (@materiallife) in New Orleans, LA ⠀ These entrepreneurs make up a collective at the Contemporary Arts Center (@cacnola) in New Orleans’ Central Business District. From left to right: Kirby Jones of La Vie En Rose Cafe (@lavieenrosecafenola) Adriane Butler of LaSalle & Jackson (@lasalleandjackson) Carla Williams and Chipo @kandake of Material Life. ⠀ “We are three independent businesses,” said Carla. “The space has always had a coffee bar and a retail space, so I reached out to Adriane because I love her products. She makes beautiful wax print clothing here in New Orleans and it was a perfect tie in for the shop. Then I brought in Kirby Jones, who owns La Vie En Rose Cafe. She had been doing different popups and installations around town. It was a great opportunity to partner with businesses that could all represent themselves under one roof.” ⠀ Founded in 2015, Material Life is a retail concept shop dedicated to gathering, promoting, archiving, and making accessible the complexity of black life and history through photography, fashion, books, fine art, artists' edition, and vintage collectibles, with a particular emphasis on African American history. An artist all her life, Carla’s love for the community in which she lives and serves is at the forefront of what drives her. ⠀ “I wanted to start a retail shop that supported local art here in New Orleans,” said Carla. “We have the absolute best people, so there was no plan B. Having a plan B means you’re setting yourself up to fail.” ⠀ — ⠀ Photography by Mariana Sheppard (@hey_mari), a documentary and conceptual photographer based in New Orleans. Her photography has been featured by @owntv, @essence, @gq, @nike, and more.

We partnered with Tynesha Foreman (@tynearshot), an Emmy award-winning animator based in NYC, and asked her to show us how she sees Square Terminal. Her work has been featured by @patriotact, @theatlantic, @nasa, and more.
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We partnered with Tynesha Foreman (@tynearshot) an Emmy award-winning animator based in NYC, and asked her to show us how she sees Square Terminal. Her work has been featured by @patriotact @theatlantic @nasa and more.

“Coffee comes from Africa — that’s where the first coffee was grown — but you don’t see a lot of people of color in the coffee industry.”⁣ ⁣ Meet the Konte family, founders of @redbaycoffee. Keba Konte dipped his toe into the specialty coffee industry in…
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“Coffee comes from Africa — that’s where the first coffee was grown — but you don’t see a lot of people of color in the coffee industry.”⁣ ⁣ Meet the Konte family, founders of @redbaycoffee Keba Konte dipped his toe into the specialty coffee industry in 2014, roasting coffee in Whirley Pops — popcorn makers — that he found at thrift stores. From his garden shed, he built something he describes as “beautiful.” Red Bay Coffee has grown into three Bay Area cafes, a roastery in Oakland’s Fruitvale district, and a location opening soon in Los Angeles. ⁣ ⁣ For the Konte family, this isn’t just about making a good cup of coffee — it’s about empowering their local community and coffee suppliers through economic opportunity. Red Bay is focused on making the speciality coffee industry a more inclusive space for everyone.⁣ ⁣ “Hiring people and creating jobs is our North Star,” says Jessica, Keba’s daughter. “We hire formerly incarcerated women and young folks coming out of the foster system. We hire women in places of leadership, especially black women, whose families originate from coffee-producing countries.⁣” ⁣ Oakland is special to Keba and his family. They were priced out of San Francisco in the 1990s and moved to Oakland with the intention of building something that would help their community thrive. Red Bay’s ethos is rooted in community, in building each other up, and in helping the city’s entrepreneurs and makers succeed.⁣ ⁣ “Tap into what your community has to offer, whether it’s startup capital or space. Use the kitchen at church during the week when it’s available. Really seek out the resources in your community, because there are more than you think.”

All eyes on brow lamination, which is exploding across the U.S. 👀 ⠀ “Affordable brow maintenance has led consumers to turn to brow lamination,” said Felipe Chacon, chief economist at Square. “While the average price point is about $70, that is still 6x *less* than…
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All eyes on brow lamination, which is exploding across the U.S. 👀 ⠀ “Affordable brow maintenance has led consumers to turn to brow lamination,” said Felipe Chacon, chief economist at Square. “While the average price point is about $70, that is still 6x *less* than its more permanent counterpart, microblading. While we see brow lamination bookings increasing more than 3,100% over the last 5 months alone, it’s opened up the same brow look to consumers who were previously priced out.”

“Barack was a regular. But once he became a Senator, he turned into a phenomenon. I remember he came in when he was on the campaign trail. He sat down in the chair, and within 10 minutes there was a crowd of people outside. He was a rock star. It was crazy.”…
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“Barack was a regular. But once he became a Senator, he turned into a phenomenon. I remember he came in when he was on the campaign trail. He sat down in the chair, and within 10 minutes there was a crowd of people outside. He was a rock star. It was crazy.” ⠀ Ishmael Coye is the owner of Hyde Park Barbershop (@hphsbarbers) on Chicago’s South Side. The barbershop is one of the oldest businesses in Hyde Park, and has been a neighborhood staple on East 53rd for nearly 100 years, with athletes, celebrities, and even presidents coming through. The shop is famously known as Barack Obama’s barbershop. ⠀ “The barbershop has been an important part of Hyde Park since 1927,” said Ishmael. “It’s a place people can feel safe. It’s a place they can be proud of. It has helped create pride in our community.” ⠀ There’s a certain nostalgia often carried by old school barbershops, and Ishmael’s has that in spades. The shop is lined with barber stations, complemented by traditional oversized leather chairs. The subtle but unmistakable aroma of Pinaud aftershave fills the air. And the clippers quietly hum under the banter between barbers and their regulars as they discuss the topics of the day. Ishmael started cutting hair for neighbors, classmates, and family when he was in 7th grade. By 14, his reputation as a barber in the neighborhood was growing. He started working at Hyde Park Barbershop after getting his barber license, and eventually took over the shop in 2002. ⠀ “Barbershops are special, and this one has been special to me for most of my life.” ⠀ — ⠀ Ishmael supports The Night Ministry (@thenightministry) a nonprofit providing housing, health care, and social services to people who struggle with homelessness, poverty, and loneliness throughout Chicago. Click the link in our bio to learn more or donate. ⠀ — ⠀ Photography by Lawrence Agyei (@lawrenceagyei) a Chicago-based portrait photographer from Ghana. His work has been featured by @thefader @apple @vsco, @newyorkermag, and more.

“When I was in prison, I met a lot of wonderful women. Those women were with me when I was lonely, when I was hurting, when I was frustrated. Those women gave me comfort and I call those women my Sister Hearts.” ⠀ Maryam Henderson-Uloho is the founder and…
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“When I was in prison, I met a lot of wonderful women. Those women were with me when I was lonely, when I was hurting, when I was frustrated. Those women gave me comfort and I call those women my Sister Hearts.” ⠀ Maryam Henderson-Uloho is the founder and owner of Sister Hearts thrift store (@sisterhearts_thriftstore) in Arabi, Louisiana. ⠀ “Sister Hearts is a thrift store and a housing facility for ex-offenders to transition back into society. It’s a bridge from incarceration to society. Because prison doesn’t allow inmates to transition, they just release them. It takes time to adjust back to society. When I got out, they wouldn’t allow me to open a bank account. I could not rent an apartment. When you would tell anybody that you’ve been to prison, you’re not gonna be able to work. So I had to start my own business.” ⠀ — ⠀ Visit square.com/dreams or click the link in our bio to watch Sister Hearts, our short film about Maryam’s story. It has been honored by @thewebbyawards @clioawards @vimeo @cannes_lions and more.

 @square
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“When I was in prison, I met a lot of wonderful women. Those women were with me when I was lonely, when I was hurting, when I was frustrated. Those women gave me comfort and I call those women my Sister Hearts.” ⠀ Maryam Henderson-Uloho is the founder and owner of Sister Hearts thrift store (@sisterhearts_thriftstore) in Arabi, Louisiana. ⠀ “Sister Hearts is a thrift store and a housing facility for ex-offenders to transition back into society. It’s a bridge from incarceration to society. Because prison doesn’t allow inmates to transition, they just release them. It takes time to adjust back to society. When I got out, they wouldn’t allow me to open a bank account. I could not rent an apartment. When you would tell anybody that you’ve been to prison, you’re not gonna be able to work. So I had to start my own business.” ⠀ — ⠀ Visit square.com/dreams or click the link in our bio to watch Sister Hearts, our short film about Maryam’s story. It has been honored by @thewebbyawards @clioawards @vimeo @cannes_lions and more.

“Who inspires me? Any black woman who’s ever done anything.” ⠀ Naj Austin is the founder and CEO of Ethel’s Club (@ethelsclub), a social and wellness club celebrating people of color. This is Naj in her own words. ⠀ “Being a black woman and building a business…
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“Who inspires me? Any black woman who’s ever done anything.” ⠀ Naj Austin is the founder and CEO of Ethel’s Club (@ethelsclub) a social and wellness club celebrating people of color. This is Naj in her own words. ⠀ “Being a black woman and building a business specifically for people of color forces me to work differently. I don't have the luxury of failing upwards. The stakes are just higher for us. I'm trying to create more space for other black women to come up while knocking down the brick walls in front of me.” ⠀ “When I first started pitching, I was asked how often people of color feel uncomfortable. I'm like, ‘Well, a lot. All of the time. Do you understand how rules and laws have been made in this country?’ That’s when I realized I had to educate white people about what it means to live as a person of color before I can even pitch my company. How can I sit in a meeting and explain how systemic racism works?” ⠀ “I'm building something that makes people feel better. When they walk in, you see their shoulders drop. They know no one's going to question why they're here. They know they're going to be treated with the respect they deserve. They see a reflection of who they are and their values. We had a member who once told me ‘When I walk into Ethel’s Club I feel like I’m at church on Sunday’ and I think about that all the time.” ⠀ “There are very few black women entrepreneurs raising venture capital. Very few who are *able* to raise venture capital. So every time you pass a hurdle, it feels like success, but it also feels like demise is always right around the corner. It’s the pressure of perfection. There's no room for error. There's no room for mistakes.” ⠀ — ⠀ Ethel’s Club, named for Naj’s grandmother, is backed by investors and advisors like @roxanegay74 @hannibalburess and @alexia Their Brooklyn space has a boutique with a rotating selection of apparel and goods designed by artisans of color. Visit shop.ethelsclub.com or click the link in our bio to shop Ethel’s Club. ⠀ — ⠀ Photography by Aundre Larrow (@aundre) a Brooklyn-based portrait and lifestyle photographer. He is an @adobe Resident, and has been featured by @apple, @CNN, and others.

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